Car Hire Newcastle

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Why Hertz

  • Best price guarantee - in the unlikely event you find a lower Hertz price, we'll refund the difference
  • No cancellation or amendment feesWhen you cancel your booking within 7 days.
  • No hidden extras to pay - theft and damage cover included
  • No credit card fees

Hertz at Newcastle

The city of Newcastle has been transformed from a proud industrial shipbuilding centre to one of the UK’s most popular city-break destinations. This up-coming city on the River Tyne is now renowned for its culture, sport and shopping.

You may be visiting Newcastle for work or pleasure - but in either case you’ll find having a car to get around the city and its surroundings helps. Our offices are sited in the most convenient spots - we’re at the airport, the railway station, in the outlying commercial districts and in the heart of the city itself. So if you do need to hire a car in Newcastle, we’ll never be far away.

Note that all our Newcastle offices operate our normal price promise. That means in the very unlikely event that you find equivalent car hire cheaper locally we’ll refund the difference immediately.

Driving in and around Newcastle

Newcastle and its neighbour on the south bank of the Tyne, Gateshead, form the major regional centre for the north east of England. There are many urban areas like Sunderland, Washington and South Shields within a short distance so having a hire car can be very useful.

These are busy commercial and residential areas so you’ll find a good road system linking them. The key routes to note include the A1, Edinburgh to London road, which forms a western bypass to Newcastle and a quick way of avoiding the busy streets of the centre. From Newcastle the A1 heads north to Morpeth, Alnwick and Berwick, and to the south it becomes the A1 (M) heading down past Darlington to meet the M1 at Leeds.

You may also need the A19, which runs north to south on the east side of the city. This allows you to link quickly with Sunderland and Middlesbrough. The A69 leads west across the Pennines to Carlisle and the A1058, known as ‘The Coast Road’ heads east to the North Sea at Tynemouth.

You’ll soon notice that many routes involve crossing the River Tyne which divides Newcastle and Gateshead. This won’t be a problem as there are several key bridges - these bridges are considered great local landmarks. The iron arch of the 1928 Tyne Bridge, for example, is one of the sights of the area, while further west, the elegant concrete Blaydon Bridge carries the A1 dual carriageway across the Tyne. The A19, meanwhile, runs through a tunnel beneath the river.

Driving in and around Newcastle is much the same as any other British city. You’ll find the busiest times are around rush hour in the morning and afternoon but the major trunk roads help you avoid the worst of the jams. Parking problems are eased by THE city council’s large selection of car park areas, including eight multi-storeys and 48 surface parks.

A quick guide to Newcastle

Officially Newcastle stands on the north bank of the Tyne, Gateshead is on the south bank. But you’ll find both areas feel like one big city. You’ll soon discover that the locals are proud to be known as ‘Geordies’ and have a distinctive accent and vocabulary.

Down by the riverside

What was once a major industrial waterway has become the centre of much of the region’s blossoming arts and cultural life. It’s a great area to wander by day or night.

This is where you’ll find the Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, an enormous art gallery inside an old riverside flour mill. Nearby you’ll see the striking modern shiny curves of the Sage Gateshead music centre. Along the northern bank you’ll find many of the most popular restaurants. Look out too for the Millennium Bridge, a modern curved pedestrian crossing that tilts dramatically to allow shipping to pass.

The best sights on Tyneside

Standing alongside the A1 to the south of the city, the Angel of the North sculpture has become a symbol of the whole area. Antony Gormley’s giant steel figure was erected in 1998 and is the UK’s largest sculpture.

An attraction of a very different kind stands a short way to the north. To most locals sport means football, and that means Newcastle United. The famous St James Park stadium to the north of the centre, is open for daytime tours.

A stronghold of a different type, Newcastle Castle is an imposing medieval fortress and gatehouse near the heart of the city that stands on the site of an earlier castle that was once considered so new that it gave the city its name.

Hit the shops

As a major regional centre, Newcastle and Gateshead offer a wide range of shopping to serve a wide area. The best known retail centre is the giant MetroCentre on the south bank of the Tyne. You’ll find more than 340 stores here, making it the UK’s largest shopping complex. Note that the central area of the complex is called the Platinum Mall and houses the more upmarket shops and restaurants.

In the centre of Newcastle, Northumberland Street is the main pedestrianised shopping stretch with a mix of the major high street stores and the grand old Victorian family-owned Fenwick Department store.

Nearby, Grey Street and the 19th-century buildings of Grainger Town form the heart of Newcastle. You’ll find the old covered market here and The Gate, a modern shopping, leisure and entertainment complex. Grainger Town is also home to Newcastle’s busy Chinatown.

Getting a taste for the area

This University City has also become renowned for its lively social scene. Some of this is found along the north bank of the Tyne in the Quayside area but it tend to be a bit more vibrant around the Bigg Market area. This wide piazza area is a little further north and you’ll find there are dozens of cafes and restaurants in a small area.

The city also offers a huge selection of live entertainment ranging from the live music to the grand old Theatre Royal and the acclaimed Dance City venue in Temple Street.